Relaxing

Your mind will answer most questions if you learn to relax and wait for the answer.

The time to relax is when you don’t have time for it.

Learn to relax. Your body is precious, as it houses your mind and spirit. Inner peace begins with a relaxed body.

Some of the secret joys of living are not found by rushing from point A to point B, but by inventing some imaginary letters along the way.

No matter how much pressure you feel at work, if you could find ways to relax for at least five minutes every hour, you’d be more productive.

It’s a good idea always to do something relaxing prior to making an important decision in your life.

Whenever in doubt, turn off your mind, relax, and float downstream.

Every now and then go away, have a little relaxation, for when you come back to your work your judgment will be surer.

If a man insisted always on being serious, and never allowed himself a bit of fun and relaxation, he would go mad or become unstable without knowing it.

As you can tell, all the above wise words are about relaxation. And what better place to relax than in St Ives? Sign up for the beautiful Blue Mist properties, where you can enjoy the beauty of the sea, the warm temperatures and the lovely beaches. Summer is coming. Are you ready?

Petition for dog ban reversal

The spring season is in full swing and now that we have reached April is it a good time to bear in mind that the dog ban on certain beaches is in force. Don’t get caught out!

The ban on dogs is rescinded in the winter months because there are hardly any sunbathers on the beach during the colder months and the dogs are hence not a threat or a nuisance. However with the warmer months approaching and more people heading for the beaches, the dog ban is now in operation.

There have however been calls for the ban on dogs to be reversed. The few beaches where dogs are allowed a poorly accessible, rocky and not just a danger to man’s best friend, but to man or woman itself.

Campaign group ‘Life’s a beach – Stop the extended dog ban in St Ives’ posted to their Facebook page as the seasonal rules came into force in St Ives over Easter.

It means those with four-legged friends are being forced to use beaches which they say are poorly accessible.

Now the post has created a huge debate online, with many dubbing it a ‘disgrace’.

One user wrote:
Ok so you’re a resident of St Ives…you pay your council tax and your extra st Ives town council precept. You own a dog….this is your access to one of the only dog beaches in town…what would you do/think/feel?

The health benefits of owning dogs is well known. It gets children out and about, provides companionship and supports people with depression. It keeps older people active…so why the heck to we have to put up with this! I don’t want to break a leg to walk my dog!

There are three beaches dogs can go on in the summer. The beach at Lambeth Walk has been highlighted for its stony paths and the council has agreed itself that that could be improved. But council representatives also claim that Barnaluz beach near the recently-opened St Ives museum is more accessible now, and has been since the steps were repaired, and dog owners may find it better there to let ttheir dogs go for a run.

Non-dog owners claim that their enjoyment of the beaches is tainted by dogs running free, threatening younger children, following their noses into picnic baskets. But dog owners claim that they are being picked on, and that non-dog owners can also spoil the beach for others in terms of litter and drug-related paraphanelia.

A holidaymaker also waded into the debate.

David Ray said: “Our family (and dog) used to visit St Ives at least twice a year, but not since these ridiculous rules were introduced.

“I wonder how much additional revenue is being lost by local business’s due to the intransigence of their local council?

“Vote them out and lets have some more sensible rules. We will then no doubt return.”

Even though the dog ban is now in force, it seems some are ignoring signs which have been put in place at the spots where dogs aren’t allowed anyway.

We just simply need a bit more consideration for everyone else.

No Drake? No problem

The St Ives Bulls RFC may have lost five players in their last match, including two props, but the rest of the team redeemed themselves with a comfortable win over Stockwood Park.

It was fly-half’s Mickey Drake’s wedding but the stand-in players showed no signs of difficulty in grinding out a 14-12 win which guarantees the promotion for the Midlands 3 East (South) league leaders.

Last season the Bulls nearly got promoted and as director of rugby Phil Brown put it, there was a sense of “let’s go get it done now” before the team took to the field to win promotion with games to spare.

St Ives when ahead when stand-in fly-half John Naylor took the opportunity to play in place of Drake to make a statement for inclusion and scored. They fell behind to to Stockwood tries later on, but a try from Duncan Williams and a conversion by Naylor turned the game in their favour. They had to dig deep to defend in the latter stages of the game, but did well to prevent Stockwood from scoring.

Promotion is now guaranteed for St Ives. The focus is now on winning the title!

Bring on Spring

As we head towards the weekend, where British Summer Time is brought in, the promise of better weather is going to mean brighter longer days. What can you do to fill them? The good thing is that there are so many things you can do at St Ives.

Among some of the places to visit:

The open-air amphitheatre, Minack Theatre

Tate St Ives, the recently re-opened gallery housing works such as those by Barbara Hepworth

The Flambards Experience – loads of rides and exciting adventures!

The Barbara Hepworth museum – see the famous working studio of the St Ives sculptress

There are also various arty places such as the Leach Pottery and St Ives Museum.

Fancy a bite? Take a walk down the harbour and take your pick from the various cafes and restaurants that line the sea front. Enjoy a nice cool beer in the sun or a cream tea as the afternoon heat bathes you in its warmth.

Why not get into the sea yourself? There are various surfing and kayaking lessons you can sign up for.

For the younger children, there are various parks and places to choose from.

Winter is over – as the song goes, turn on the sun!

Car left hanging over Thicket path

A man has been arrested over drink-drug charges after a grey Seat saloon was left having over thet Thicket path between St Ives and Houghton.

The path is not open to vehicular access and is a popular cycleway and footpath between the two towns. It is not clear whether any members of the public were within the vicinity where the saloon was dumped, and left hanging dangerously.

The use of the car down a cycle way will of course suggest that the driver and his passenger were either intoxicated or not of sound mental function when they were driving.

The incident happened on 11:25am on Wednesday morning and while the occupants of the car were reported to have fled the scene, police later confirmed that a 25-year old man from Somerset had been arrested.

The Thicket path has vehicular access to part of the track at each end. It is only 500m long, and is a narrow bank of ash and field maple woodland, and it is not clear if the driver was trying to take a short cut when it happened, or merely got confused.

The incident will surely rile environmentalists. Nesting birds line the side of the path, with the Great River Ouse in close proximity, and the natural woodland has been there for a long time. The dead wood encourages insects to migrate there, and they provide food for the nesting birds which include green woodpeckers.

Areas of natural beauty rely on human common sense for their preservation and it is sad that a place like the Thicket path has been disturbed by one stupid act.

Learning a new skill?

How do you feel when you have to learn something new? Some people feel a sense of excitement at the thought of a new experience. These individuals are generally more open-minded, open to learning new things. But there are others who perhaps come with a sense of reservation, or even caution at the thought of learning something new, or trying something different. For them, the extension of oneself is effortful and they are unwilling to make the effort – or at least, the initial reaction is of unwillingness, and then some people overcome it, while others are content to remain within it.

There is no doubt that the attraction of learning a new skill for many people comes with a sense of aspiration and idealism. We envision how the skill we would like to acquire can benefit us, not just financially, but also in enriching our lives. But sometimes we look at things from the wrong perspectives, looking for fame and recognition itself. It is not wrong in itself to seek these things, but when they become the sole purpose of learning a new skill then we have started off on the wrong foot. An aspiring singer of course should want to make a living from doing something that he or she likes, but when the focus is on wanting to make it big as a singer-songwriter, and being the object of attention of millions in a big arena, then the lens needs reviewing.

Why should we not look for these benefits primarily? When we learning a new skill, it takes time to do it well. Skills develop over time and continually revisiting these skills in order to do well requires patience and the correct mindset. Focussing on the wrong things at the start, unfortunately, blurs the focus and invites you to shorten the natural process. A lot of people go for the product and not the process, because they want to end-gain, to get to the final product immediately, because they are hungry for the success. While the idea is to produce a final product as a result of going through a process, producing a product just to say it’s been done and thinking it’s finished is wrong.

How long do you think it takes to learn the piano? Many pianists go through hours of practice, going over boring things such as scales and technical exercises to sightreading just to learn to play music. But there are others who think that being able to play Fur Elise means they have learn to play the piano. That is the difference between process and product.

Perhaps it is a good idea to learn little craft skills to subconsciously learn the life skills of patience and practice, which build on a deeper level good estimations of time and required effort. Instead of leaving it till late to discover that you have not quite yet have the correct mindset to things, when the stakes are too high, it may be a good idea to do little artistic skills, slightly less ambitious tasks, to learn about learning. This gives you a mental framework of what it takes to learn a skill. If you’re ever in St Ives, you’ll find many things to do, from weekend workshops to day events. Try to get some ideas of what you might like to try just browsing around the many crafts shops around. There’s knitting. Surfing. Cake-decorating. Art. Painting. While it may be good to try something you are drawn to, trying something that might not come naturally in the first place is also a good place to develop a healthy mindset to new situations, if you belong to the latter group of people I mentioned in the first paragraph.

St Ives offers you many opportunities to learn about learning – it is a skill that will benefit you for life! And if you are ever looking for a place to stay, why not try the Blue Mist properties? You can choose from a small studio, a mid-sized room to a larger room for families or groups. Located near the harbour and gorgeous scenic views, the Blue Mist properties will allow you to enjoy your stay and make full use of your time here.

Peter Lanyon exhibition to mark birth centenary

An artist from St Ives has been honoured with an exhibition to mark then centenary of his birth.

Born in 1918, Peter Lanyon unfortunately died in a gliding accident in 1964. His traditional landscape art works were held in high regard, particularly by the singer, the late David Bowie, who had four of Lanyon’s work in his collection.

At first glance, Lanyon’s work may appear to be oil drawings by a young child, with colours smeared over one another. But perhaps you have to understand the artist to appreciate the art work. Within the art world, Lanyon is credited with transforming landscape art. The use of colours is a vibrant attempt to capture the unbridled emotion of being physically in the place at the time. Sure, it is not neat as in a photograph, or a detailed still life painting. But the art perhaps captures the underlying emotion, albeit a raw, childish one, of the subject in question.

The last of the above paintings, Wheal Owles, is an oil on board painting that dates back to 1958. At first it looks like a fishing boat on sea, and visitors unfamiliar to area may think it is a representation of a boat and St Ives history as a fishing town.

However, Wheal Owles is actually a tin mine near Botallack, near St Just. In January 1893, miners working underground were drowned when water rushed in. When you look again at the picture, now that streak of black in the middle makes sense – it is the mining shaft. The boarded shapes around it not only suggest the materials on the ground, but the feeling of being trapped and bordered with no way out echoes the fear of the men who were trapped and eventually died. It is said that before the water flooded in, a gust of wind blew out the lights, leaving the man trapped in darkness. This mirrors the lack of light in the work.

‘Peter Lanyon: Cornwall Inside Out’ at Hazlitt Holland-Hibbert, in St James’s, London, is open until 16 March.

Knowles stays for the moment!

Cambridge United winger Tom Knowles, currently on loan at St Ives Town, has had his loan spell extended for least another month.

Knowles has made a name for himself within St Ives since arriving from Cambridge. On his debut game for St Ives, he scored a goal and also teed up another, making a major impact in a game which ended 3-0 within minutes of only just coming on as a substitute.

The team manager Ricky Marheineke praised his work rate and energy among other things, and there were fears that he might be recalled to his parent club, but these fears have been allayed for the moment.

It is good news for St Ives to continue having the services of Knowles for that period – hopefully the team can keep him for even longer after that!